How ‘twisted’ early childhood education has become — from a child development expert

young girl on playgroundFrom the Washington PostValerie Strauss shares a speech by Nancy Carlsson-Paige, an early childhood development expert and professor emerita of education at Lesley University.  Nancy Carlsson-Page said:

So never in my wildest dreams could I have foreseen the situation we find ourselves in today.

Where education policies that do not reflect what we know about how young children learn could be mandated and followed. We have decades of research in child development and neuroscience that tell us that young children learn actively — they have to move, use their senses, get their hands on things, interact with other kids and teachers, create, invent. But in this twisted time, young children starting public pre-K at the age of 4 are expected to learn through “rigorous instruction.”

And never in my wildest dreams could I have imagined that we would have to defend children’s right to play.

Play is the primary engine of human growth; it’s universal – as much as walking and talking. Play is the way children build ideas and how they make sense of their experience and feel safe. Just look at all the math concepts at work in the intricate buildings of kindergarteners. Or watch a 4-year-old put on a cape and pretend to be a superhero after witnessing some scary event.

But play is disappearing from classrooms. Even though we know play is learning for young kids, we are seeing it shoved aside to make room for academic instruction and “rigor.”

I could not have foreseen in my wildest dreams that we would have to fight for classrooms for young kids that are developmentally appropriate. Instead of active, hands-on learning, children now sit in chairs for far too much time getting drilled on letters and numbers. Stress levels are up among young kids. Parents and teachers tell me: children worry that they don’t know the right answers; they have nightmares, they pull out their eyelashes, they cry because they don’t want to go to school. Some people call this child abuse and I can’t disagree.

I could not have foreseen in my wildest dreams that we would be up against pressure to test and assess young kids throughout the year often in great excess — often administering multiple tests to children in kindergarten and even pre-K. Now, when young children start school, they often spend their first days not getting to know their classroom and making friends. They spend their first days getting tested.

Read the full story at How ‘twisted’ early childhood education has become — from a child development expert

Nathan S. Gibson

Nathan S. Gibson is an independent contractor compliance business partner who provides clients with expertise and creative solutions to enhance workforce flexibility and maintain compliance with complex and changing worker classification requirements. He offer the ability to mitigate the risks associated with the misclassification of self-employed consultants, freelancers and independent contractors.

As more companies look to independent contractors, freelancers, and self-employed workers to meet the need for specialized talent, companies face risks of worker misclassification when they lack the appropriate process and criteria for classifying a worker as an employee or independent contractor. By properly screening and evaluating independent contractors, freelancers and self-employed consultants, companies can avoid fines and penalties by ensuring compliance with state and federal requirements.

Nathan provides clients with the necessary expertise and innovative solutions to maintain compliance through the delivery of Independent Contractor Risk Assessment Services and Independent Contractor Compliance and Management Solutions. He mitigates clients’ risks and help provide them with a through contingent worker solution.

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *